These instructions are only sample suggestions for goals and objectives because in real situations, every client has unique circumstances; thus, the art therapy intervention methods/techniques used require customization for each individual.
These images were not made by actual clients but by myself and other art therapists in order to maintain the confidentiality of clients' artworks as is required by HIPPA. (Updated Apr 2016)

Click the left images to enlarge.

Myths and Realities about Art

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about the role of art therapists and the field of art therapy in general. One erroneous perception is that clients must create some type of art at every art therapy session. This is not true at all; some sessions consist primarily or even solely of talking dedicated to discussing and finding ways to resolve the client’s issues. There is no requirement for clients to produce artworks at every session. The goal of art therapy is not to produce stellar artworks; it is to employ the benefits of art in a therapy setting.

Another myth about art therapy is that it’s just for artists. This is completely untrue; art therapy can benefit all types of clients regardless of their artistic abilities or talent. Art therapy aims to create a comfortable environment for all clients to be able to utilize art in a healing and helpful way. The aim of art therapy is not to teach art to clients, but to use art in a therapeutic manner. Clients can enjoy many benefits from art therapy regardless of the artistic ability that they display during sessions.

Another mistaken idea about art therapy is that it’s for children only and not for adults. This myth is completely false; in fact art therapy can serve to benefit people of all ages. Some art therapy practices are geared solely towards the elderly, while other art therapists serve clients of all ages. Art therapy can help clients of all ages express emotions, recover from emotional hurts, and assist in creating positive changes in their lives along with numerous other benefits.

Another prevalent and very incorrect myth is that art therapists are just artists with no real credentials or qualifications. This perception is completely false. In fact, most art therapists are required to earn either master’s degree or a Ph.D. in the study of art therapy. Registered art therapists must earn at least a master’s degree in art therapy and complete a set amount of on the job training hours. Art therapists certified by the Art Therapy Credentialing Board must complete supervised clinical training and pass an examination8.

A common myth about art therapy is that only people with who are experiencing a major crisis can benefit from art therapy. In fact art therapy can be beneficial to clients going through all sorts of mental health issues or afflictions involving physical conditions. Clients can utilize art therapy to strive for personal awareness and build confidence among many other uses. Although people going through severe mental distress can stand to benefit greatly from art therapy, other individuals experiencing less traumatic mental health and other issues can also stand to greatly benefit from art therapy.

Art therapy brings together the benefits of art and the clinical and theoretical applications of psychotherapy. The healing properties of art therapy can be beneficial for clients of all ages and with varying issues. Art therapists usually either have earned a master’s degree or a PhD. Degree in art therapy. There are many graduate programs in art therapy for interested students to choose from. Master’s programs in art therapy usually take two years to complete while a Ph.D. degree in art therapy usually takes about three years. Both programs require candidates to either write a research thesis or prepare a research dissertation on a topic relating to art therapy. Students have chosen to focus their research on a large variety of areas including the effect of art therapy in drama on female adolescent or the effect of nature in art therapy.

There are many resources available to students and professionals in art therapy. There are many national organizations dedicated to art therapy like the American Art Therapy Association; there are also state art therapy associations available to those in the art therapy field. There are also numerous publications available to art therapy students and professionals including the Arts in Psychotherapy Journal and many others. There are many myths and incorrect assumptions about art therapy but with a little bit of research one can discover that art therapy is a field that strives to help all kinds of people by introducing them to the benefits of art therapy.

Resources:

1.http://www.arttherapy.org/aata-awards.html

2.http://www.arttherapy.org/aata-ethics.html

http://www.ieata.org/

4.http://www.atwb.org/

5.http://www.arttherapy.org/

6.http://www.journals.elsevier.com/the-arts-in-psychotherapy/

7.http://digitalcommons.lmu.edu/jcat/about.html

8.http://www.atcb.org/home/registration

These instructions are only sample suggestions for goals and objectives because in real situations, every client has unique circumstances; thus, the art therapy intervention methods/techniques used require customization for each individual.
These images were not made by actual clients but by myself and other art therapists in order to maintain the confidentiality of clients' artworks as is required by HIPPA. (Updated Apr 2016)

Click the left images to enlarge.

Myths and Realities about Art

There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about the role of art therapists and the field of art therapy in general. One erroneous perception is that clients must create some type of art at every art therapy session. This is not true at all; some sessions consist primarily or even solely of talking dedicated to discussing and finding ways to resolve the client’s issues. There is no requirement for clients to produce artworks at every session. The goal of art therapy is not to produce stellar artworks; it is to employ the benefits of art in a therapy setting.

Another myth about art therapy is that it’s just for artists. This is completely untrue; art therapy can benefit all types of clients regardless of their artistic abilities or talent. Art therapy aims to create a comfortable environment for all clients to be able to utilize art in a healing and helpful way. The aim of art therapy is not to teach art to clients, but to use art in a therapeutic manner. Clients can enjoy many benefits from art therapy regardless of the artistic ability that they display during sessions.

Another mistaken idea about art therapy is that it’s for children only and not for adults. This myth is completely false; in fact art therapy can serve to benefit people of all ages. Some art therapy practices are geared solely towards the elderly, while other art therapists serve clients of all ages. Art therapy can help clients of all ages express emotions, recover from emotional hurts, and assist in creating positive changes in their lives along with numerous other benefits.

Another prevalent and very incorrect myth is that art therapists are just artists with no real credentials or qualifications. This perception is completely false. In fact, most art therapists are required to earn either master’s degree or a Ph.D. in the study of art therapy. Registered art therapists must earn at least a master’s degree in art therapy and complete a set amount of on the job training hours. Art therapists certified by the Art Therapy Credentialing Board must complete supervised clinical training and pass an examination8.

A common myth about art therapy is that only people with who are experiencing a major crisis can benefit from art therapy. In fact art therapy can be beneficial to clients going through all sorts of mental health issues or afflictions involving physical conditions. Clients can utilize art therapy to strive for personal awareness and build confidence among many other uses. Although people going through severe mental distress can stand to benefit greatly from art therapy, other individuals experiencing less traumatic mental health and other issues can also stand to greatly benefit from art therapy.

Art therapy brings together the benefits of art and the clinical and theoretical applications of psychotherapy. The healing properties of art therapy can be beneficial for clients of all ages and with varying issues. Art therapists usually either have earned a master’s degree or a PhD. Degree in art therapy. There are many graduate programs in art therapy for interested students to choose from. Master’s programs in art therapy usually take two years to complete while a Ph.D. degree in art therapy usually takes about three years. Both programs require candidates to either write a research thesis or prepare a research dissertation on a topic relating to art therapy. Students have chosen to focus their research on a large variety of areas including the effect of art therapy in drama on female adolescent or the effect of nature in art therapy.

There are many resources available to students and professionals in art therapy. There are many national organizations dedicated to art therapy like the American Art Therapy Association; there are also state art therapy associations available to those in the art therapy field. There are also numerous publications available to art therapy students and professionals including the Arts in Psychotherapy Journal and many others. There are many myths and incorrect assumptions about art therapy but with a little bit of research one can discover that art therapy is a field that strives to help all kinds of people by introducing them to the benefits of art therapy.

Resources:

1.http://www.arttherapy.org/aata-awards.html

2.http://www.arttherapy.org/aata-ethics.html

http://www.ieata.org/

4.http://www.atwb.org/

5.http://www.arttherapy.org/

6.http://www.journals.elsevier.com/the-arts-in-psychotherapy/

7.http://digitalcommons.lmu.edu/jcat/about.html

8.http://www.atcb.org/home/registration